Category: Gitxaala

Environmental groups seek to delay $10 billion LNG project in B.C.

Breadcrumb Trail Links News Local News Business Groups seek delay for B.C.’s Ksi Lisims LNG project, citing emission caps concerns The proposed site of the Ksi Lisims LNG project at Wil Milit at the northern tip of Pearse Island in the Portland Canal, north of Prince Rupert, B.C. Photo by Nisga’a Lisims Government Article content More than a dozen environmental groups are asking the province to delay planning on what would be B.C.’s second-largest LNG project so that its effects on federal and provincial emissions caps could be considered. Advertisement 2 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content In an open letter published on May 25, Pat Moss, a coordinator for the environmental group Friends of Wild Salmon and a signatory of the letter, wrote that a lack of details on upcoming federal and provincial emission caps made it difficult to accurately determine how the $10-billion, Nisga’a-led Ksi Lisims LNG project would impact emissions targets. They asked the province to “significantly” extend the current public comment period, which ran from April 27 to May 29, or to postpone environmental assessment until more information on federal and provincial emissions caps was available. “A public comment period should not be conducted when it is unclear how forthcoming legislation and regulations will impact what needs to be considered,” Moss wrote. Article content Advertisement 3 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content The groups requested the delay to allow “the time necessary to review project documents and prepare submissions regarding the climate and other impacts of this project.” Matthew Borghese, a spokesperson for B.C.’s Environmental Assessment Office, said the office was not planning to extend the current public comment period. “The environmental assessment process will include at least two additional public comment periods,” Borghese wrote. One that will include greenhouse gas assessments. “The draft plan proposes that the proponent be required to prepare information that enables assessment of greenhouse gas emissions in relation to federal and provincial legislation,” Borghese wrote. B.C.’s Environmental Assessment Act requires the office to take into account the impact of a project on the province’s greenhouse gas emissions during the environmental assessment process, which could take up to 18 months or more to complete. Advertisement 4 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content An environmental analysis of the Ksi Lisims LNG export facility was green lit by the assessment office in mid-March, just days after the B.C. government gave final approval to the $2.4-billion Haisla Nation’s Cedar LNG project. Nisga’a leadership say the Ksi Lisims project – located in northwest B.C. near the border of Alaska –  will be “net-zero” emissions from Day 1, in part by tapping into B.C. Hydro’s electrical grid to power the facility as well as a carbon offset management program. “We’re confident that the Ksi Lisims LNG project’s sustainable and innovative design will enable us to meet the government’s new standards,” said Rebecca Scott, a spokesperson for Ksi Lisims LNG. Electrifying the facility would first mean the construction of 95 kilometres of power lines to the site. Much of that would cross the territory of First Nations who have expressed concerns about environmental and other impacts of the construction. Advertisement 5 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content Without electrification, emissions would be up to 1.9 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent per year — nearly three per cent of B.C.’s annual emissions and the equivalent of burning nearly a billion kilograms of coal every year. And that only includes emissions from the facility itself. When emissions generated by the fracking and transportation of LNG — so-called “upstream” emissions — are included, the figure more than doubles. The Pembina Institute, a clean energy think-tank, estimated the Ksi Lisims project would generate the same emissions as burning 2.3 million tonnes of coal every year. That’s about the same as a million gas-powered cars each year. The project is expected to operate for 30 years. Advertisement 6 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content “Fundamentally, we shouldn’t be doing any of this,” John Young, an energy transition strategist with the David Suzuki Foundation which also signed the open letter, said of B.C.’s LNG expansion plans. “It is a very strange enterprise … for a government that is genuinely committed to making progress on the climate emergency.” Young said LNG facilities are typically powered by natural gas, not electricity, and that would lead to an increase in the amount of gas that needs to be extracted from B.C. “We’re talking about a significant expansion of fracking,” he said, that will contribute “to an increase in global greenhouse gas emissions.” Young said that virtually all of the gas processed by the facility is intended to be sold overseas. Advertisement 7 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content “We’re loading up our emissions in Canada, exporting a massive number of emissions globally, for very few jobs,” he said. In a letter to the B.C. EAO dated March 7, Eva Clayton, president of the Nisga’s Lisims government, called the Ksi Lisims project a “generational opportunity” to achieve lasting reconciliation. “The Nisga’a Nation is committed to building the project so that it is compliant with BC climate mitigation laws and policy,” Clayton wrote. — with a file from Gord Hoekstra $10 billion Nisga’a-led LNG project gets green light to enter environmental review Rising costs raise doubts about future of B.C. LNG $2.4‑billion Cedar LNG project on Haisla-owned land near Kitimat gets B.C. approval @njgriffithsngriffiths@postmedia.com More news, fewer ads, faster load time: Get unlimited, ad-lite access to The Vancouver Sun, The Province, National Post and 13 other Canadian news sites for just $14/month or $140/year. Subscribe now through The Vancouver Sun or The Province. Share this article in your social network Comments Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings. Join the Conversation Advertisement 1 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

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Northern Lights goes solar

The site of Prince George’s first ever Sunflower Festival is going green. The Foreman Farms property, which is owned and operated by Northern Lights Estate

Read More »

Seizure and sale closes Prince George’s Salted Cracker – Prince George Citizen

Acting on a court-ordered writ of seizure and sale, a bailiff has locked the doors on a chain of Prince George lunch spots.

Notices on the doors of the four Salted Crackers in the city were posted Tuesday saying all supplies, stock, furnishings and appliances have been seized.

The outcome stems from a court action that began slightly more than a year ago when Gordon Food Service Canada Ltd. filed a notice of claim in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver stating the supplier is owed $69,431.43 plus interest spread over 71 unpaid invoices dating back as far as December 2019.

According to the claim a numbered company, of which Michael Kenneth Pockett is listed as the sole proprietor, entered into an agreement in which GFS was to be paid no later than 14 days after the date of each invoice for supplies sold to Salted Cracker. Overdue accounts are subject to 18 per cent annual interest.

By Feb. 23, 2023, GFS had secured an order from the court stating Pockett owed $104,912,98 made up of the $69,431.43 plus $35,491.55 in interest. On April 27, a requisition was issued for the write of seizure and sale.

In a letter to Salted Cracker sent to staff on Tuesday afternoon that has since been posted on social media, Pockett confirmed that a bailiff has seized the restaurants’ assets to cover a debt from an “old food supplier.”

“The company had been dealing with this since Covid closures but GFS got impatient with our payments,” Pockett said. “The bailiffs have taken everything…all equipment, all furniture, the white van and two of our personal vehicles and our house.”

All the locks on the properties have been changed, Pockett said, and added he has been be allowed to enter by appointment to retrieve tax records and personal items.

“So needless to say, I have lost everything I own and the company is out of business. 

“I cannot apologize enought for the stress this has caused…I (sic) so, so, so very sorry….”

The list of invoices itemized in the notice of claim indicates that by January 2022, Salted Cracker had turned for the better as the three invoices listed for that month were marked as paid in full.

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Northern, central B.C. airports getting upgrades – Prince George Citizen

Nine small airports in northern and central B.C. are receiving provincial grants to support economic development, improve safety and increase access for rural communities.

The provincial government announced $19.8 million in funding for 40 projects at 29 rural and remote airports in B.C. through the BC Air Access Program. Projects include runway extensions, improved runway lighting, pavement improvements, terminal enhancements and better fire protection.

“The BC Air Access Program helps communities, especially smaller ones, with important improvements to their aviation facilities,” Transportation Minister Rob Fleming said in a statement. “This investment will help move people and goods, improve safety and benefit front-line services, like air ambulance and wildfire fighting, as well as making for more secure access to remote and Indigenous communities.”

Projects in northern and central B.C. which received funding include:

* 108 Mile – $2 million for runway rehabilitation.

* Bob Quinn Lake – $87,650 for an airport master plan and for a solar-powered weather camera with altimeter and satellite uplink.

* Dease Lake – $88,200 for an airport master plan and new batteries for solar-powered hazard beacons.

* Fort St. James – $2 million for the runway end safety area, lighting improvements and a master plan.

* Fraser Lake – $55,650 for pavement markings and an upgrade to runway shoulders.

* Kitimat – $511,250 for a greenhouse gas emission audit, and taxiway and apron improvements.

* McBride – $259,000 to rehabilitate runway and airside pavement.

* Vanderhoof – $330,984 for runway and apron lighting.

* Williams Lake – $83,750 for an apron lighting upgrade and two automatic security gates.

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Environmental groups seek to delay $10 billion LNG project in B.C.

Breadcrumb Trail Links News Local News Business Groups seek delay for B.C.’s Ksi Lisims LNG project, citing emission caps concerns The proposed site of the Ksi Lisims LNG project at Wil Milit at the northern tip of Pearse Island in the Portland Canal, north of Prince Rupert, B.C. Photo by Nisga’a Lisims Government Article content More than a dozen environmental groups are asking the province to delay planning on what would be B.C.’s second-largest LNG project so that its effects on federal and provincial emissions caps could be considered. Advertisement 2 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content In an open letter published on May 25, Pat Moss, a coordinator for the environmental group Friends of Wild Salmon and a signatory of the letter, wrote that a lack of details on upcoming federal and provincial emission caps made it difficult to accurately determine how the $10-billion, Nisga’a-led Ksi Lisims LNG project would impact emissions targets. They asked the province to “significantly” extend the current public comment period, which ran from April 27 to May 29, or to postpone environmental assessment until more information on federal and provincial emissions caps was available. “A public comment period should not be conducted when it is unclear how forthcoming legislation and regulations will impact what needs to be considered,” Moss wrote. Article content Advertisement 3 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content The groups requested the delay to allow “the time necessary to review project documents and prepare submissions regarding the climate and other impacts of this project.” Matthew Borghese, a spokesperson for B.C.’s Environmental Assessment Office, said the office was not planning to extend the current public comment period. “The environmental assessment process will include at least two additional public comment periods,” Borghese wrote. One that will include greenhouse gas assessments. “The draft plan proposes that the proponent be required to prepare information that enables assessment of greenhouse gas emissions in relation to federal and provincial legislation,” Borghese wrote. B.C.’s Environmental Assessment Act requires the office to take into account the impact of a project on the province’s greenhouse gas emissions during the environmental assessment process, which could take up to 18 months or more to complete. Advertisement 4 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content An environmental analysis of the Ksi Lisims LNG export facility was green lit by the assessment office in mid-March, just days after the B.C. government gave final approval to the $2.4-billion Haisla Nation’s Cedar LNG project. Nisga’a leadership say the Ksi Lisims project – located in northwest B.C. near the border of Alaska –  will be “net-zero” emissions from Day 1, in part by tapping into B.C. Hydro’s electrical grid to power the facility as well as a carbon offset management program. “We’re confident that the Ksi Lisims LNG project’s sustainable and innovative design will enable us to meet the government’s new standards,” said Rebecca Scott, a spokesperson for Ksi Lisims LNG. Electrifying the facility would first mean the construction of 95 kilometres of power lines to the site. Much of that would cross the territory of First Nations who have expressed concerns about environmental and other impacts of the construction. Advertisement 5 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content Without electrification, emissions would be up to 1.9 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent per year — nearly three per cent of B.C.’s annual emissions and the equivalent of burning nearly a billion kilograms of coal every year. And that only includes emissions from the facility itself. When emissions generated by the fracking and transportation of LNG — so-called “upstream” emissions — are included, the figure more than doubles. The Pembina Institute, a clean energy think-tank, estimated the Ksi Lisims project would generate the same emissions as burning 2.3 million tonnes of coal every year. That’s about the same as a million gas-powered cars each year. The project is expected to operate for 30 years. Advertisement 6 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content “Fundamentally, we shouldn’t be doing any of this,” John Young, an energy transition strategist with the David Suzuki Foundation which also signed the open letter, said of B.C.’s LNG expansion plans. “It is a very strange enterprise … for a government that is genuinely committed to making progress on the climate emergency.” Young said LNG facilities are typically powered by natural gas, not electricity, and that would lead to an increase in the amount of gas that needs to be extracted from B.C. “We’re talking about a significant expansion of fracking,” he said, that will contribute “to an increase in global greenhouse gas emissions.” Young said that virtually all of the gas processed by the facility is intended to be sold overseas. Advertisement 7 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Article content “We’re loading up our emissions in Canada, exporting a massive number of emissions globally, for very few jobs,” he said. In a letter to the B.C. EAO dated March 7, Eva Clayton, president of the Nisga’s Lisims government, called the Ksi Lisims project a “generational opportunity” to achieve lasting reconciliation. “The Nisga’a Nation is committed to building the project so that it is compliant with BC climate mitigation laws and policy,” Clayton wrote. — with a file from Gord Hoekstra $10 billion Nisga’a-led LNG project gets green light to enter environmental review Rising costs raise doubts about future of B.C. LNG $2.4‑billion Cedar LNG project on Haisla-owned land near Kitimat gets B.C. approval @njgriffithsngriffiths@postmedia.com More news, fewer ads, faster load time: Get unlimited, ad-lite access to The Vancouver Sun, The Province, National Post and 13 other Canadian news sites for just $14/month or $140/year. Subscribe now through The Vancouver Sun or The Province. Share this article in your social network Comments Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings. Join the Conversation Advertisement 1 Story continues below This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Read More »

Northern Lights goes solar

The site of Prince George’s first ever Sunflower Festival is going green. The Foreman Farms property, which is owned and operated by Northern Lights Estate

Read More »

Seizure and sale closes Prince George’s Salted Cracker – Prince George Citizen

Acting on a court-ordered writ of seizure and sale, a bailiff has locked the doors on a chain of Prince George lunch spots.

Notices on the doors of the four Salted Crackers in the city were posted Tuesday saying all supplies, stock, furnishings and appliances have been seized.

The outcome stems from a court action that began slightly more than a year ago when Gordon Food Service Canada Ltd. filed a notice of claim in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver stating the supplier is owed $69,431.43 plus interest spread over 71 unpaid invoices dating back as far as December 2019.

According to the claim a numbered company, of which Michael Kenneth Pockett is listed as the sole proprietor, entered into an agreement in which GFS was to be paid no later than 14 days after the date of each invoice for supplies sold to Salted Cracker. Overdue accounts are subject to 18 per cent annual interest.

By Feb. 23, 2023, GFS had secured an order from the court stating Pockett owed $104,912,98 made up of the $69,431.43 plus $35,491.55 in interest. On April 27, a requisition was issued for the write of seizure and sale.

In a letter to Salted Cracker sent to staff on Tuesday afternoon that has since been posted on social media, Pockett confirmed that a bailiff has seized the restaurants’ assets to cover a debt from an “old food supplier.”

“The company had been dealing with this since Covid closures but GFS got impatient with our payments,” Pockett said. “The bailiffs have taken everything…all equipment, all furniture, the white van and two of our personal vehicles and our house.”

All the locks on the properties have been changed, Pockett said, and added he has been be allowed to enter by appointment to retrieve tax records and personal items.

“So needless to say, I have lost everything I own and the company is out of business. 

“I cannot apologize enought for the stress this has caused…I (sic) so, so, so very sorry….”

The list of invoices itemized in the notice of claim indicates that by January 2022, Salted Cracker had turned for the better as the three invoices listed for that month were marked as paid in full.

Read More »

Northern, central B.C. airports getting upgrades – Prince George Citizen

Nine small airports in northern and central B.C. are receiving provincial grants to support economic development, improve safety and increase access for rural communities.

The provincial government announced $19.8 million in funding for 40 projects at 29 rural and remote airports in B.C. through the BC Air Access Program. Projects include runway extensions, improved runway lighting, pavement improvements, terminal enhancements and better fire protection.

“The BC Air Access Program helps communities, especially smaller ones, with important improvements to their aviation facilities,” Transportation Minister Rob Fleming said in a statement. “This investment will help move people and goods, improve safety and benefit front-line services, like air ambulance and wildfire fighting, as well as making for more secure access to remote and Indigenous communities.”

Projects in northern and central B.C. which received funding include:

* 108 Mile – $2 million for runway rehabilitation.

* Bob Quinn Lake – $87,650 for an airport master plan and for a solar-powered weather camera with altimeter and satellite uplink.

* Dease Lake – $88,200 for an airport master plan and new batteries for solar-powered hazard beacons.

* Fort St. James – $2 million for the runway end safety area, lighting improvements and a master plan.

* Fraser Lake – $55,650 for pavement markings and an upgrade to runway shoulders.

* Kitimat – $511,250 for a greenhouse gas emission audit, and taxiway and apron improvements.

* McBride – $259,000 to rehabilitate runway and airside pavement.

* Vanderhoof – $330,984 for runway and apron lighting.

* Williams Lake – $83,750 for an apron lighting upgrade and two automatic security gates.

Read More »